An Ant Can Have a Hill

I think on some level that this is obvious.  I would begin at once to condemn the idea that was so uniform when I was a kid, that we were all unique and special.  Frankly, in all my years of schooling, I’ve probably met two genuinely brilliant people.  But back then, “self-esteem” was the sort of buzzword that was considered so important to the fostering of a functioning adulthood ethos.  Of course, the damage that attitude has done is obvious even today, but I think that most people still esteem themselves worthy of greatness, just waiting for that special moment when their real life will finally begin.  Of course, do they consider that their current middling, miserable lives could be their real lives, that these are the things that they must either accept or correct to be happy or are they entirely oblivious?  I will genuinely err that people do wonder, people do know, deep down at least in the moments before sleep robs us of our awareness; I have that much faith at least. Perhaps a year ago I presented this picture with a short caption on Twitter.  Now, I’m not important enough to find offensive, but the response Read More …

The Days He Lived and Loved and Laughed

Moths frequently appear to circle artificial lights, although the reason for this behavior remains unknown. One hypothesis to explain this behavior is that moths use a technique of celestial navigation called transverse orientation. By maintaining a constant angular relationship to a bright celestial light, such as the moon, they can fly in a straight line. Celestial objects are so far away that, even after travelling great distances, the change in angle between the moth and the light source is negligible; further, the moon will always be in the upper part of the visual field, or on the horizon. When a moth encounters a much closer artificial light and uses it for navigation, the angle changes noticeably after only a short distance, in addition to being often below the horizon. The moth instinctively attempts to correct by turning toward the light, thereby causing airborne moths to come plummeting downward, and resulting in a spiral flight path that gets closer and closer to the light source. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Moth#Attraction_to_light